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  • jfleish 4:24 pm on September 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    Something to chew on… Jeff spoke a li… 

    Something to chew on…

    Jeff spoke a little about the amount of mischief that we can do with new media such as twitter before being caught. Do you think that people or journalists who use new technology should be accountable to someone or something? How should we ensure that the news coming out of this new technology is correct and true?

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  • jfleish 4:20 pm on September 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    Response from Professor Farrelly: There … 

    Response from Professor Farrelly: There is a role for credibility in news cycle. The way you get credibility is through experience. We need to have trust in sources. Even though I share your skepticism [in for-profit media], the kind of experience I mentioned earlier in establishing credibility is not inexpensive to produce. Quality is costing NY Times 3 million a year. Wondering, if, the problem is the idea of a for profit-media, since 1980 profit expectations associated with news have skyrocketed.

     
  • jfleish 4:17 pm on September 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    Jeff’s Conclusion Non-profit media is… 

    Jeff’s Conclusion

    Non-profit media is the answer. We don’t run our schools or universities for profit, why should news be any different?

    Focused activism can steer evolutionary process. Democracies always evolving, and ours will evolve into a non-profit model. Internet is a big part. Demo. systems don’t simply unfold on their own. They’re social organisms. Legal structures evolve along with cultural influences. At some point in that evolution new media may prove to be tipping point. Knowledge is a core democratic value. News, like education, must be rescued from marketplace.

    Powerful independent media sector is crucial step. Commercial media created isolated levels of excellence. The narrowing of range of acceptable opinion is limited on coverage of diversity. The duality of news is only one side of this problem; the supply side. Demand side also important.

    We need higher levels of civic literacy. Ultimately its the public conciousness of what democracy is that determines the course and pace of change.

    Only the software of the human brain can create good journalism. If new media can replace it better, bring it on, but first show me the money.

     
  • jfleish 4:15 pm on September 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    From the twitter discussion: Check out t… 

    From the twitter discussion: Check out this article: http://www.buzzmachine.com/2009/09/10/a-poor-craftsman-blames-others-tools/

     
  • jfleish 4:12 pm on September 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    What is journalistic excellence? “4 gr… 

    What is journalistic excellence? “4 graces of journalism:”

    (1) Common truth, or what we happen to agree about. Not something inscribed in the universe. Allows to talk with minimum coherence.
    (2) In service of wider understanding we need explanation. Umbrella term is context. Everything either is in context or has it. Context is a part of excellence in education and journalism alike.
    (3) Journalism must perform watchdog role in democracy and hold institutions accountable in actions and statements.
    (4). Excellence depends on independence. Perfect independence is impossible, but the more, the better. Important reason why gov’r and private orginizations should provide our news.

    THE INTERNET MAY BE SAVIOR OF JOURNALISM EVEN IF BLOGOSPHERE IS NOT.

     
  • jfleish 4:08 pm on September 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    “New media are excellent reservoirs and… 

    “New media are excellent reservoirs and aggregators. Fills crucial data vacuums. It can also spread rumors, or crush them. Twitter responsible for spreading false rumor in July that Harrison Ford drowned. It can still do a lot of mischief before getting caught and corrected. Nothing would delight me more than an excuse to eulogize the Mainstream Media. I have radical ideas of what should replace them. I’ve gotten over the fact that my kids don’t read print news. I’m worried about young people getting a grasp on civic engagement. All of those people are citizens that need to grasp.

    We need a mainstream media, or MSN. Just not the one we have. Minimal spin to bind us as communities. We’ve had partisan news for centuries and now we have it on cable as well.

    We need some news that strives to be nonpartisan to stabilize conversation. Perfect objectivity only found in numbers and identities. Everything organized and framed, interpreted. We need ideology in certain quarters….. If all we have is Bill O’Reilly and Keith Oberman, something is lost. The civility of only talking with ideological components and certain dignity.

     
  • jfleish 4:03 pm on September 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    Jeff gets into more into the need for ci… 

    Jeff gets into more into the need for citizen journalism and its danger:

    “First, like education or knowledge, news is hard to define. Of course there is a role for citizen journalism, as we’ve seen a lot in recent years. There’s a role for home schooling too but there’s a level of skepticism. Education in journalism joined at the hip. News is extension of journalism. Democracy needs news for obvious reasons. Democratic machine needs fuel. Fuel is informed, intelligent, direct energy of people.”

     
  • jfleish 3:59 pm on September 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    Jeff uses the example of how he’s frien… 

    Jeff uses the example of how he’s friends with former high school classmates on facebook that he never talks to introduce the idea that the “one side of me think there’s too much communication out there. Gadgets are wonderful but we need to spend more time thinking and focusing on quality. Our tools are only as good or as smart as we are.”

    Is there too much communication out there? What’s the danger of being too connected?

     
  • jfleish 3:55 pm on September 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    Here’s the intro to Jeff’s speech: In… 

    Here’s the intro to Jeff’s speech:

    In the new media universe that’s emerging, we as citizens need to be optimally media literate. We need to think critical about knowledge and info. Not to talk so much about new media per say, and I must confess I need kids help to download apps to iPhone, but to try to set new media in larger context. Any media’s most important function is its democratic function. They could advance democracy in some interesting and unobvious ways. I’m gonna talk about subset of info we want, which is the info we need.

     
  • jfleish 3:53 pm on September 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    Session II: Jeffrey Scheuer 

    After a nice break with some food and drink to reinvigorate the media table, we are set to go with the second session!

    Session II: Free to be Excellent? The Costs of Being Informed in a Digital Age
    Time: 3:45-5:15 pm

    Speaker: Jeffrey Scheuer, Independent Commentator on Media and Democracy

    Faculty respondent: Maura Jane Farrelly, Director, Journalism Program, Brandeis University

    Student respondent: Ariel Wittenberg ’11, The Brandeis Hoot

    Watch the event LIVE: Click Here

     
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